Women’s rights: Healthcare & Hospitals

(Last Updated: 24 August 2021)

Patient safety fears as NHS allows trans sex offenders in female-only wards
The Telegraph – 02/08/2021

Report on NHS and Police Accommodation for the Provision of Female-Only Services
England and Wales only
Standing For Women – 07/06/2021

Availability and Clarity of Information on Patient Single-Sex Accommodation provided by the NHS
WHRC Research Paper – April 2021
WHRC UK has published its first piece of research into the provision of single-sex accommodation and same-sex medical practitioners in NHS trusts in England and Wales.

De-sexing the Medical Record? An Examination of Sex Versus Gender Identity in the General Medical Council’s Trans Healthcare Ethical Advice
The New Bioethics (Sara Dahlen) – 03/02/2020

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Gender Identity: Children

(Last Updated: 14 September 2021)

‘School rushed to help our boy become a girl’
The Sunday Times – 22/08/2021

Online Transgender Clinic Doctor Appears Before Tribunal Over Patient Care
Medscape – 27/07/2021

Tavistock gender clinic ‘converting’ gay children
The Sunday Times – 20/06/2021

Sweden’s Karolinska Ends All Use of Puberty Blockers and Cross-Sex Hormones for Minors Outside of Clinical Studies
SEGM – 05/05/2021

Tavistock trust whistleblower David Bell: ‘I believed I was doing the right thing’
The Observer – 02/05/2021

Is ‘affirmation’ gay conversion therapy for children and young people?
Transgender Trend – 01/04/2021

‘Children have been very seriously damaged’ by NHS gender clinic, says former Tavistock staff governor
Channel 4 News – 23/01/2021

Children’s gender identity clinic concerns go back 15 years
BBC – 01/10/2020

Ethical issues arising in the provision of medical interventions for gender diverse children and adolescents
Dr. Bernadette Wren – 14/06/2019

When Sons Become Daughters: Parents of Transitioning Boys Speak Out on Their Own Suffering
Quillette – 02/04/2021
When Sons Become Daughters, Part II: Parents of Transitioning Boys Speak Out on Their Own Suffering
Quillette – 06/04/2021
When Sons Become Daughters, Part III: Parents of Transitioning Boys Speak Out on Their Own Suffering
Quillette – 12/04/2021
When Sons Become Daughters, Part IV: Parents of Transitioning Boys Speak Out on Their Own Suffering
Quillette – 21/04/2021
When Sons Become Daughters, Part V: The Links Between Trans Identity, Gifted Minds, Categorical Thinking—And Anime
Quillette – 11/05/2021
When Sons Become Daughters, Part VI: Asexuality, Intelligence, and the Trans Co-Option of Intersex Discourse
Quillette – 07/06/2021

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Gender Identity: Democracy, Lobbying, Corruption

(Last Updated: 25 August 2021)

Civil servants to be asked to include pronouns in email sign-offs
The Telegraph – 26/07/2021

Majority of Scottish Government civil servants say they’ll never add pronouns to their email signatures
Holyrood (original source of news) – 14/07/2021

Stonewall equality list ‘bullies bosses and silences dissent’
The Times – 26/06/2021

Avon and Somerset police paid Stonewall thousands learning to be LGBT ally
The Times – 26/06/2021

Stonewall advises organisations to use ‘parent who has given birth’ to help boost ranking
The Telegraph – 03/06/2021

Dentons campaigns for kids to switch gender without parental approval
Roll On Friday – 29/11/2019

“Only adults? Good practices in legal gender recognition for youth”
IGLYO, Dentons, Reuters – November 2019

The Political Erasure of Sex
An overarching project which aims to document the process of policy capture in our public institutions, and how it is impacting the recognition and recording of biological sex in public policy, law, language, and data-collection.

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The Trans Umbrella Is Older Than You Think

Years ago I was a ‘trans ally’.

I thought ‘trans’ meant transsexual and my idea of a ‘trans woman’ was someone who had had genital surgery and was quietly going about their life, doing their best to ‘pass’ as a woman, or at least look as if they were trying. I knew a few such people back then and they seemed to fit this idea. Whenever I encountered an unknown ‘trans woman’ in a public toilet (never ever in any other female spaces back then) I noticed and I felt uncomfortable. But I was polite and respectful and did my best to pretend not to notice because how awful it must be for them. And after all, it didn’t happen often.

I also knew a few men who were not transsexual but who wore women’s clothing. Some did it just because it was the 1980’s and they looked good in it, so why the hell not? There were others though…

There was a boyfriend who liked to cross-dress in the evenings as he found it ‘relaxing’. I tolerated this until he started trying to introduce his hobby into our sex life. And no thanks, I did not want to go to a tea dance at Madame JoJo’s with him ‘dressed’ and no thanks I did not want to join Wives of Beaumont.

There was a man who developed a creepy stalky fetish around my sister and tried to dress just like her, look just like her and copy all her mannerisms, especially if they would be at the same event. He went to my sister’s wedding dressed as my sister. He was kind of tolerated on the edge of our small-town social crowd but all the women knew he was a creepy fucker and we kept a sharp eye on him.

We were never expected to believe or even pretend that any of these other non-transsexual men were women. We were never expected to respect their ‘identities’ or welcome them into female spaces. We naively imagined we had a sort of ‘honour system’: we wouldn’t make a fuss if transsexuals used the women’s toilets as long as they behaved (despite never having been asked if we were OK with this in the first place) and as long as we could tell the rest of these men to get to fuck.

So it was a bit disconcerting when things like this started to appear in the mid 2010’s:

The category of ‘trans’ now apparently included drag queens, transvestites and cross-dressers, according to ‘a bunch of queer and trans folks who lived in Houston, Texas.’ For a couple of years it was possible to think that this was just some outlandish idea that nobody would take seriously.

Then in 2015 Stonewall, the largest and most influential UK charity for lesbian and gay rights, became ‘trans inclusive’ and they took this outlandish idea very seriously indeed. Their definition of ‘trans’ would henceforth be:

‘An umbrella term to describe people whose gender is not the same as, or does not sit comfortably with, the sex they were assigned at birth.

‘Trans people may describe themselves using one or more of a wide variety of terms, including (but not limited to) transgender, transsexual, gender-queer (GQ), gender-fluid, non-binary, gender-variant, crossdresser, genderless, agender, nongender, third gender, bi-gender, trans man, trans woman,trans masculine, trans feminine and neutrois.’

Reference – https://www.stonewall.org.uk/help-advice/faqs-and-glossary/glossary-terms
Archive link – https://archive.is/TPXvw

Quite suddenly, whatever ‘honour system’ we imagined we had was broken because we were no longer permitted to tell the rest of these men to get to fuck. They were all ‘trans’ now and to object to the presence of any of them in our single sex spaces and services was ‘transphobic’.

But the trans umbrella is older than we thought.

Here is a version from 1994. Note the inclusion of ‘crossdresser’, ‘transvestic fetishist’ and ‘transvestite’.

The trans rights movement in the UK started with the Beaumont Society – a club for heterosexual cross-dressing men and their wives, set up in 1966. Transsexuals were permitted to join but the main focus until relatively recently was definitely male cross-dressers.

https://www.yumpu.com/en/document/view/6971183/a-short-beaumont-history-the-beaumont-society

Alternative link – https://www.beaumontsociety.org.uk/documents/Beaumont_History.pdf

The Beaumont Society was started by Alice Purnell, following an epiphany in a soho sex shop:

‘Anyway, I searched and searched through bookshops, and of course I read Krafft-Ebing and Magnus Hirschfeld and Freud, and everybody you could think of. And always they associated anything to do with gender variance as a type of deviance, and I got more and more horrified by this and I thought, what the hell am I going to do, and I came across … would you believe it, in a dirty book shop in Soho, a magazine called Transvestia and I thought, what? And this was a magazine produced by a Dr Virginia Prince, who was an American pharmacist, and she had organised a thing called Phi Pi Epsilon, very American, which stands for Full Personality Expression. And the essence of her thesis was that you could be a woman, though male. So the goal of her organisation was to try to maintain marriages or relationships between men and women when one or the other, usually the one that was officially male, gender migrated by cross-dressing or by being what eventually we came to know as transsexual. The whole vocabulary of gender was a dreadful, dreadful nuisance.’

You can hear all about it in this enlightening interview of Alice by best mate Christine Burns:

Christine Burns’ show ‘Just Plain Sense’ on SoundCloud – Alice Purnell’s Memoirs

My guest on this show is a former geriatric nurse and a counsellor. She writes poetry and lives in Hove. Alice Purnell OBE is perhaps best known to many listeners as the founder of the Gender Trust, a support organisation for trans people. Before that she had also been involved in co-founding the Beaumont Society, in the mid 1960s. She also founded a ground breaking series of biennial conferences, bringing together international clinicians and stakeholders for the first time in the 1990s to discuss improvements to care for such people. Alice speaks about all that and more at home on the South Coast as she celebrates her 70th birthday.

Burns went on to set up Press For Change with Stephen Whittle in 1992. In the early 1970’s Whittle had co-founded the Manchester Transvestite and Transsexual Support Group, and had also joined Beaumont as the first ftm (female-to-male) member.

Christine Burns’ show ‘Just Plain Sense’ – An Interview with Stephen Whittle OBE (22-05-2008)

Dr Stephen Whittle is perhaps the world’s best known transsexual man. He is Professor of Equalities Law at Manchester Metropolitan University, the President of the World Professional Association for Transgender Health and the Chair of Transgender Europe, in addition to being one of the founders of the UK lobby group Press for Change. He is also a committed family man, with a wife and four children. In this in-depth interview, originally recorded in summer 2007, we cover his own personal background growing up in Manchester, his transition in the 1970’s, his work as a campaigner, and his views about the future for trans people.

Press For Change is the organisation that is pretty much solely responsible for the Gender Recognition Act being passed in 2004. They championed the use of the term ‘trans’ precisely because it made no distinction between ‘transsexual’ and ‘transvestite’. Christine Burns:

‘Until human rights campaigners like us came along, talking about umbrella concepts, this diverse community had got along with a relatively stable lexicon for many years. There were ‘transvestites’ and ‘transsexuals’ – TVs and TS’s in the community shorthand – and that was more or less the only language you needed to know for more than a generation since Harry Benjamin had coined the latter term in his book ‘The Transsexual Phenomenon’ in 1966.

‘Our successes as a campaign were grounded in progress made for people who fitted the clinical definition of transsexual. At the heart of this was a tacit understanding that people in positions of power might be persuaded to change laws for people with some kind of clinically underwritten status – something they couldn’t help being. This is why ‘Transsexualism – The Medical Viewpoint’ was seen as strategically important and why all the key court cases had rehearsed the developing scientific understanding of a basis for us being born or developing this way. It was also why the government would expect to include a medical definition of ‘transsexual’ in the forthcoming employment protections they planned to consult upon.

‘We knew in our hearts at that time that policymakers and judges weren’t yet sophisticated enough in their understanding to contemplate rights for people whose difference appeared self-identified or impermanent or maybe even optional. That didn’t mean we weren’t going to try where possible. There was a valid freedom of expression case to be made for people to be able to present in whatever way they wish. But we were also pragmatists, careful not to frighten the horses at this early stage. (Note, however, that in the Equality Act 2010 – which replaced the Sex Discrimination Act – the requirement for having been medically diagnosed was finally removed).

‘I cannot recall exactly how we reached a consensus inside Press for Change. It wasn’t written down in email correspondence – it arose in telephone or face to face conversations, including the long calls I was now having with Claire McNab on Sunday afternoons before setting off for another hotel. Somehow or other, however, we arrived at a consensus that if we maybe all used the word ‘trans’ as an umbrella term – and words like ‘transsexual’ only when we needed to be more specific’ then maybe some of that would catch on gradually.

‘And so that is what we did. From there on, without fanfare, my essays and our web content discreetly began to use this language. Claire took the opportunity during the move of the PFC website to revise the existing content in the same way.

‘In the weeks and months ahead people would sometimes ask what the word meant or why we were using it. Then we would explain the rationale and suggest why we thought it was important. The change was gradual. In fact it took years for the word to begin sounding familiar and to hear it in other people’s language. In 2002 when we were consulting over government press releases to announce the forthcoming Gender Recognition Bill, the officials still weren’t convinced that enough people understood the new word to use it. Yet today most people seem to embrace the word naturally – when they are not simply calling themselves men or women.’

(From Christine Burns: Pressing Matters Vol. 1)

Throughout the history of trans rights campaigning there has never been a time when transsexuals and transvestites were not working together, involved in the same groups, pursuing the same aims, or at least intertwining their aims in mutually beneficial ways. All that happened in the mid 2010’s is that they started being open about this and stopped pretending it was all about rights for a tiny number of transsexuals.

Perhaps they decided that policy makers and judges were now ‘sophisticated enough’ and it would no longer ‘frighten the horses’ to campaign openly for transvestites’ and cross-dressers’ rights. Or perhaps they decided they had now pushed through enough legislation, that completely coincidentally gave unintended rights to cross-dressing men, that it didn’t matter if they now showed their hand. Ha ha, too late. The strong push-back against GRA reform and the sharp, renewed focus on the Equality Act, suggest they may have miscalculated.

Gerry Davies, 2021

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Gender Identity: Schools

(Last Updated: 19 August 2021)

Transgender guidelines for girls schools quietly scrapped by the equalities watchdog
The Telegraph – 09/05/2021

Guidance to schools on transgender acknowledgement ‘breaches law’
The Sunday Times – 09/05/2021

Scots council referral for parents who ‘fail’ to support trans child
The Sunday Times – 24/01/2021

Boys and Girls and the Equality Act – Guidance for Schools (Scotland)
Transgender Trend and Sex Matters have produced a guide specifically for Scotland about the responsibilities of schools under the Equality Act 2010 towards all boys and girls in relation to the protected characteristics of sex, and “gender reassignment.”

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Women’s rights: Toilets

(Last Updated: 20 May 2021)

Exclusive: Return of ladies and gents lavatories, as ministers tell architects all new buildings must have separate facilities
The Telegraph – 15/05/2021

The unexpected link between access to toilets and women’s rights
Ideas 4 Development – 14/11/2019

The History of Women’s Public Toilets in Britain
Historic UK

Women’s right to sit comfortably
Museum of London – 06/09/2017

Female-friendly public and community toilets: a guide for planners and decision makers
Water Aid

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Women’s rights: Prisons

(Last Updated: 14 September 2021)

Keep Prisons Single Sex

‘I was sexually assaulted in a women’s prison… by a fellow inmate with male genitalia’: Read Amy’s story and decide – can it be right to put trans sex offenders in female jails?
Daily Mail (Julie Bindel) – 23/07/2021

Radical: Women are the casualties when judges capitulate to gender ideology
Conservative Home – 16/07/2021

Women’s prisons and male transgender prisoners
Women’s Place UK – 07/07/2021

Transgender prison policy: judicial review ruling confirms trans rights do conflict with women’s rights
Fair Play For Women – 06/07/2021

The law must protect women in prison
Sex Matters – 02/07/2021

Prison bosses put transgender sex offenders into female prisons because they need “association with other women”
Fair Play For Women – 16/05/2021

Head injuries suffered by 80% of women prisoners
BBC News – 14/05/2021

Transgender women exhibit a male-type pattern of criminality: Implications for legislators and policy makers
Fair Play For Women – 12/12/2020

Opaque and overdue: the Scottish Prison Service trans prisoner policy review
Dr Kath Murray, Lucy Hunter Blackburn and Lisa Mackenzie – 02/12/2020

We need open discussion on the welfare of women in prison
Rhona Hotchkiss – 10/12/2020

Women’s prisons should be single-sex
Kate Coleman – 17/12/2020

Prisons – Fair Play For Women

Ministry of Justice: Updated Policy on caring for Transgender Prisoners
STILLTish – 19/09/2019
Below is a quote from James Morton, of the Scottish Trans Alliance, which shows that Female prisoners are the subjects of a dangerous laboratory experiment. James is listed as an author of the Scottish Prisons Policy which deals with Transgender Prisoners. As James is a lobbyist for Trans Rights there is only one group at the forefront of the policy. Spoiler. It’s not Women.

‘We strategized – we strategized – that by working intensively with the Scottish Prison Service to support them to include trans women as women on a self-declaration basis within very challenging circumstances, we would be able to ensure that all other public services should be able to do likewise’.

The above quote is illustrative of a complete disregard for the female prison population; one of the most vulnerable groups in our society. Domestic violence refuges, rape crisis centres and female prisons do seem to figure prominently in the targeted locations. Captive females are being targeted for this new branch of Men’s rights activism.

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New evidence that trans women have male pattern of criminality – Fair Play For Women (FPFW)

The Women and Equalities Select Committee heard from female academics on 9 December 2020 that trans women present no less a risk to women than men do, based on their pattern of criminality. Professor Rosa Freedman cited a large-scale study of crime data in Sweden, but Nicola Richards MP questioned whether this was true.

Now Fair Play For Women has uncovered new data for the prison population in England and Wales showing that trans-identifying males have a pattern of criminality similar to men, and not like that of women. The findings come from Ministry of Justice data obtained through a Freedom of Information request. They show that at least 66, and perhaps as many as 76, of 129 trans-identifying males in prison in England and Wales have one or more convictions for a sexual offence.

Fair Play For Women Ltd is a campaigning and consultancy organisation which raises awareness, provides evidence and analysis and works to protect the sex-based rights of women and girls in the UK. Founded in 2017, their work is focused on understanding when and how gender-and sex-based rights conflict in law and policy making. Their aim is to ensure everyone’s needs are fairly balanced and women and girls are not overlooked in good policy-making.

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